Experiential learning sparked by curiosity and fostered with collaboration

Student Research

Explore the Questions that Need Answers

UCLA offers experiences for undergraduate, graduate and visiting students.

CONDUCTING UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH HELPS STUDENTS EXPLORE THEIR INTERESTS, GAIN EXPERIENCE AND DEVELOP SKILLS.


Digital humanities students create a database of African-American silent films ― and inspire a museum exhibit. Environmental science students survey the impact of oil drilling on a neighborhood and share results at a public forum. Biology students conduct field research in French Polynesia and publish their results in a scientific journal. At UCLA, undergraduates have the opportunity to work on original research not only in the STEM sciences, but in the humanities, arts and social sciences. Two on-campus centers help match faculty and students for research opportunities.

The Undergraduate Research Center for Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences works to serve students and faculty in the humanities, arts, social science and behavioral science disciplines. The center promotes, develops and celebrates undergraduate student research with the overall goal of enhancing undergraduate education and preparing students for careers in all areas.

The Undergraduate Research Center for Sciences works to serve students and faculty in the life and physical sciences, engineering and mathematics. The center focuses on increasing the retention of science majors in all disciplines, as well as preparing students for academic and research careers.

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GRADUATE STUDENTS WORK WITH FACULTY MENTORS ON THE ENTIRE SPECTRUM OF RESEARCH PROJECTS.

Thousands of original research projects are undertaken each year by UCLA graduate and professional students, working as part of a team or independently. Their research may create scientific and medical advances, address urgent societal problems or deepen understanding of arts and cultures.

In May 2017, UCLA psychology graduate student Leslie Rith-Najarian won the University of California Grad Slam competition with her research on interventions to prevent anxiety and depression among college students. Grad Slam’s three-minute time limit challenges graduate students to communicate their work in a way that’s understandable to the general public.

Only one graduate student wins Grad Slam, but all students have the opportunity to shape research questions and advance knowledge in their chosen field.

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